Golden Tate is on his last leg with the New York Giants. The veteran wide receiver has marred with controversy this season regarding his displeasure in how head coach Joe Judge and offensive coordinator Jason Garrett have chosen to utilize him, and it boiled over in Week 8 against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” — when Tate yelled toward the Giants sideline to “throw me the damn ball!” following his first catch of the evening. He then stared into the cameras and doubled down on the demand, but he won’t have an opportunity to catch anything in Week 9.

“We’ll evaluate everything and make decisions on the back end of today of what we’re going to do going through the weekend,” said Judge following the in-game outburst, via The New York Post. “I’m going to discuss a lot of possibilities.”

The Pro Bowl wideout will not travel with the Giants to face off with the Washington Football Team, per Kim Jones of NFL Network, instead, remaining home due to Judge’s concerns over effort and performance. The latter item is bound to deepen the controversy, considering Tate scored a touchdown in each of the last two weeks, helping to awaken a struggling offense — despite the Giants losing both games.

Even in those contests, however, Take was targeted a total of just five times and had only three receptions, and his overall yardage hasn’t topped the 50-yard mark a single time this season. The reduction in the use of Tate combines with his frustration and that of the Giants to fuel speculation of a potential trade ahead of the Nov. 3 deadline, but one never came. The decision to keep Tate as opposed to trading him — which would also allow them to garner savings toward the salary cap — will now be dissected a hundred different ways in an attempt to find the logic that may not exist.

If traded ahead of the deadline, the Giants would’ve saved $8 million in cap space, per Over The Cap. And while they’ll land the same savings if they opt to release him at some point before the offseason, the lack of a return in exchange for the divorce is a glaring thorn. Should the Giants allow Tate to play out his 2020 season and move on in 2021, the savings will take a mostly negligible bump to $8.5 million. 

Tate signed a four-year, $37.5 million contract with the Giants in 2018 that included $23 million in guaranteed money. He was highly productive in his first year with the club, reeling in a solid 676 receiving yards and six touchdowns. But with the regime change at head coach and coordinator has come both a drop in utilization and the accompanying frustrations from both sides, leaving the future of Tate in question but, by all accounts, he wouldn’t exactly be all broken up if they set him free soon. 

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