Facebook Users Identify Relic: Mystery of “Gold Artifact” That Stumped Archaeologists Solved

Facebook Users Identify Relic: Mystery of 'Gold Artifact' That Stumped Archaeologists Solved

Facebook users helped Israel’s Antiquities Authority this week identify a mysterious gilded object once thought to be an ancient Jewish relic as a modern New Age device.

The grooved object was handed to Israel’s Antiquities Authority (IAA) six months ago after it was found by a maintenance worker inside an old building at an unidentified cemetery in Jerusalem.

Amir Ganor, head of the robbery prevention unit at the IAA, said his office X-rayed the object and analysed its materials.

Experts did not recognise the gold item, believing it could be historical or modern.

Some researchers believed the object could have been a treasure from Jewish temples hidden throughout Jerusalem’s western Valley of the Cross, with religious and scientific experts initially engaged, Haaretz reports.

With no further leads, the IAA put the mystery to the public by posting a picture of the 17.5lb object on its Facebook page.

Of the 300 people who responded to the appeal, one managed to identify the object.

Known as a ‘Weber Isis Beamer’, it is a 50-year-old energy protection device sold online by a firm named Weber in Germany, whih sells a range of bio-energy systems and technologies.

“The wisdom of the masses has done its part,” the IAA said earlier this week.

Mr Ganor told Haaertz: “It was placed inside a plastic pip, covered in cotton and preserved with an anti-oxidant. The pipe was buried a metre-and-a-half underground.

“Since its discovery, Antiquities Authority officials have been trying to understand what this object is. It was sent to a lab at the Weizmann Institute of Science, and was discovered to be plated in nickel gold, but made from a single metal.

“At first we thought it was a military object, but then began to dream. I have been in this business for a long time and cannot recall such a mystery.”

Sportact Editors and Wire Services